"HOME"

HONORS

African Americans, perhaps more than any other populations in the Americas, have been shaped by migration. Their culture and history are the products of black peoples' various movements, coerced and voluntary, that started in the Western Hemisphere 500 years ago. The Great Migration of the 20th century, was the largest internal migration of any enthic group in U.S. history, Nearly six million black people fled from the south, moving to the north, the mid-west, and the western states. History is repeating itself in the 21st century as blacks are migrating en mass back to the southern regions of the U.S.   Analyses of the 2010 cenus report by famed demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institute, revealed that 58% of the black population in the U.S. reside in the south, officially naming this era The New Great Migration.  As major urban centers throughout the north, the mid-west, and as far west as Los Angeles embrace gentrification as the process for urban renewal, African Americans are being pushed out of traditional black communities However more positive pull-factors in the south include better housing, better professional and entrepreneurial opportuniteis.  .

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BLACK BRITS MOVING TO U.S. OPP TO LIVE IN THE SOUTH. (CLICK TO PLAY)

STAN ZEPHERIN and his family bring this New Great Migration full circle straight from London, England. This 21st century phenomenon of blacks relocating to the southern regions of the U.S. has seen a huge influx of Black Brits relocating to Atlanta, GA. due to similar push factors of their western counterparts: The gentrification   of traditional black communities In London has given rise to Black Brits seeking better opportunites abroad. D.J. Stan Zeff's TAMBOR TRIBE brand is flurishing in the U.S., as is recording artist JULIE DEXTER.

THE GREAT MIGRATION
THE GREAT MIGRATION

This is the classic photograph that has represented the black family of the Great Migration during the 20th century, when nearly six million African Americans left the south in what became the largest internal migration of any ethnic group in the history of the nation. Known as The Great Migration, when black people went to the North, the Mid-west, and the West seeking a better life than what they had known. History is repeating itself as African Americans are returning to the south.

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THE NEW GREAT MIGRATION
THE NEW GREAT MIGRATION

The Balthrops live in Clarksdale, a small town in the Mississippi Delta. Their family portrait represents the new African American Family of the 21st century. Dr. Erica Belthrop decided to come back home to Mississippi where she felt her skills as a physician would be better served. She her husband Hugh built their home on land that sits across the road from where Dr. Balthrop's family once labored on a Mississippi plantation.

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STAN ZEPHERIN
STAN ZEPHERIN

STAN ZEPHERIN and his family bring this New Great Migration full circle straight from London, England. This 21st century phenomenon of black people relocating to the southern regions of the U.S. has seen a huge influx of Black Brits relocating to Atlanta, GA.

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JULIE DEXTER
JULIE DEXTER

Britsh-born Recording Artist JULIE DEXTER is one of the many great artists featured in the new documentary HOME. Julie shares her story of choosing the South over New York and LA to create a home-base for her recording career. Julie is among an entire community of Black Brits in Atlanta, who have opted to make the South their HOME.

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               THEN                                           NOW                                         STAN ZEFF                          JULIE DEXTER

                                                                                                       

JUDGE D'ARMY BAILEY

DR. MAYA ANGELOU

"HOME"

HONORS THE MEMORY OF 

HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF IN THE 21ST CENTURY

AS BLACKS MOVE SOUTH

HOME ... The Documentary Movie

About African Americans Moving South

DR. MAYA ANGELOU
DR. MAYA ANGELOU

Dr. Maya Angelou, renowned poet, novelist, humanitarian, has lived an extraordinary life. Raised by her grandmother in Stamps, Arkansas during the era now known as the Jim Crow South. Today she resides in Winston-Salem, NC. Between now and then she has lived in San Francisco, CA, New York City, Cairo, Egypt, and West Africa. It is a blessing to have her sage-like wisdom in the HOME Project.

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MORGAN FREEMAN
MORGAN FREEMAN

Morgan Freeman has lived in Hollywood, and in New York City during the early years of his acting career. Morgan decided to come back South, back HOME to Mississippi where he built his home on the same spot where his parents once lived in a shack.

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AMBASSADOR ANDREW YOUNG
AMBASSADOR ANDREW YOUNG

Andrew Young was born in New Orleans. He left home to go North to seminary college. However, he returned home to join Dr. King in the Civil Rights Movement. Following those early years of the Freedom Movement, he was elected mayor of Atlanta, the city that is the Mecca of The New Great Migration.

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JOHN LEWIS
JOHN LEWIS

Often called "one of the most courageous persons the Civil Rights Movement ever produced," JOHN LEWIS, was born the son of sharecroppers on February 21, 1940, outside of Troy. He has dedicated his life to protecting human rights, securing civil liberties, and building what he calls "The Beloved Community” in America. His dedication to the highest ethical standards and moral principles has won him the admiration of many of his colleagues on both sides of the aisle in the United States Congress.

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REV. CT VIVIAN
REV. CT VIVIAN

HOME is honored to have the contribution of Rev. CT Vivian. A living legend whose story resides among the lexicons of "the first". He helped organize the first Sit-ins in Nashville in 1960. He was among the first "Freedom Riders" in Jackson, Mississippi, on May 24, 1961. He was a lieutenant in Dr. King's camp, where he lead several Voting Rights campaigns that helped usher in the passage of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 that made it possible to elect the Nations first Black presidfent

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TERENCE BLANCHARD
TERENCE BLANCHARD

Terence Blanchard returned to his home town of New Orleans, after living in New York City of several years, developing his career in the world of Jazz Music. He shares his journey of coming back HOME to the south, and how things have changed, giving younger musicians the option of not having to leave the south to become successful.

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VASTI JACKSON
VASTI JACKSON

Blues Man Vasti Jackson a native Mississippian, is a scholar of American Musical History, and one of the most proficient blues guitarist on the planet. Vasti shared his music on the HOME Soundtrack, and he shared his knowledge of the how the blues helped shape American Musical Culture.

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JUDGE D'ARMY BAILEY
JUDGE D'ARMY BAILEY

Judge D'Army Bailey, a retired circuit court judge, civil rights activist, author and film actor, born in Memphis, Tennessee. Judge Bailey was the first Black city councilman in Berkeley, California, from 1971-73. When he returned home to Memphis, he became the Founder of The Civil Rights Museum, formerly the Lorraine Hotel. His honesty and candor brought historical integrity to the HOME project.

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STAN ZEPHERIN
STAN ZEPHERIN

STAN ZEPHERIN and his family bring this New Great Migration full circle straight from London, England. This 21st century phenomenon of black people relocating to the southern regions of the U.S. has seen a huge influx of Black Brits relocating to Atlanta, GA.

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ROBIN BURGESS
ROBIN BURGESS

Robin Burgess relocated from Washington, DC to New Orleans, where she established Burgess Management, and artist management business that successfully oversees the careers of musicians, filmmakers, and performing artist. One of her most successful clients is her husband Terence Blanchard.

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VIVIAN JOINER & STEPHANIE TYSON
VIVIAN JOINER & STEPHANIE TYSON

Stephanie Tyson and Vivián Joiner are the owners of Sweet Potatoes Restaurant in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They talk about the success they have had since they moved from Washington, DC to the south, and finally realized their dream of opening a restaurant.

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MELISSA PROCTOR & DIOP GANT
MELISSA PROCTOR & DIOP GANT

Melisa made the decision to leave Washington, DC to relocate to the Rosewell, GA, a suburban community near Metro Atlanta. She wanted to raise her son in an environment where he could be safe, and where he could be a part of an educational system that would prepare him for college. She shares her journey and what the South means to her and why the South feels like HOME.

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MY YANNICK
MY YANNICK

Yannick attended the Harlem HOME screening.

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THE FAMILY
THE FAMILY

Me and my peeps at the Harlem screening of HOME. (L-R - Yannick, Naimah, Monifa, Bashiri

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EVA & YANNICK
EVA & YANNICK
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HARLEM SCREENING
HARLEM SCREENING

Producer/Director NAIMAH FULLER at the screening of HOME in Harlem. From L-R Supporter, Cliff Frazier , Naimah Fuller, Warrington Hudlin, Michelle Materre

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REP. JOHN LEWIS APPEARS IN "HOME"

Often called "one of the most courageous persons the Civil Rights Movement ever produced," JOHN LEWIS has dedicated his life to protecting human rights, securing civil liberties, and building what he calls "The Beloved Community” in America. His dedication to the highest ethical standards and moral principles has won him the admiration of many of his colleagues on both sides of the aisle in the United States Congress. He was born the son of sharecroppers on February 21, 1940, outside of Troy, Alabama. He grew up on his family's farm and attended segregated public schools in Pike County, Alabama. As a young boy, he was inspired by the activism surrounding the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the words of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., which he heard on radio broadcasts. In those pivotal moments, he made a decision to become a part of the Civil Rights Movement. Ever since then, he has remained at the vanguard of progressive social movements and the human rights struggle in the United States.

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