"HOME"

HONORS

African Americans, perhaps more than any other populations in the Americas, have been shaped by migration. Their culture and history are the products of black peoples' various movements, coerced and voluntary, that started in the Western Hemisphere 500 years ago. The Great Migration of the 20th century, was the largest internal migration of any enthic group in U.S. history, Nearly six million black people fled from the south, moving to the north, the mid-west, and the western states. History is repeating itself in the 21st century as blacks are migrating en mass back to the southern regions of the U.S.   Analyses of the 2010 cenus report by famed demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institute, revealed that 58% of the black population in the U.S. reside in the south, officially naming this era The New Great Migration.  As major urban centers throughout the north, the mid-west, and as far west as Los Angeles embrace gentrification as the process for urban renewal, African Americans are being pushed out of traditional black communities However more positive pull-factors in the south include better housing, better professional and entrepreneurial opportuniteis.  .

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BLACK BRITS MOVING TO U.S. OPP TO LIVE IN THE SOUTH. (CLICK TO PLAY)

STAN ZEPHERIN and his family bring this New Great Migration full circle straight from London, England. This 21st century phenomenon of blacks relocating to the southern regions of the U.S. has seen a huge influx of Black Brits relocating to Atlanta, GA. due to similar push factors of their western counterparts: The gentrification   of traditional black communities In London has given rise to Black Brits seeking better opportunites abroad. D.J. Stan Zeff's TAMBOR TRIBE brand is flurishing in the U.S., as is recording artist JULIE DEXTER.

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               THEN                                           NOW                                         STAN ZEFF                          JULIE DEXTER

                                                                                                       

JUDGE D'ARMY BAILEY

DR. MAYA ANGELOU

"HOME"

HONORS THE MEMORY OF 

HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF IN THE 21ST CENTURY

AS BLACKS MOVE SOUTH

HOME ... The Documentary Movie

About African Americans Moving South

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REP. JOHN LEWIS APPEARS IN "HOME"

Often called "one of the most courageous persons the Civil Rights Movement ever produced," JOHN LEWIS has dedicated his life to protecting human rights, securing civil liberties, and building what he calls "The Beloved Community” in America. His dedication to the highest ethical standards and moral principles has won him the admiration of many of his colleagues on both sides of the aisle in the United States Congress. He was born the son of sharecroppers on February 21, 1940, outside of Troy, Alabama. He grew up on his family's farm and attended segregated public schools in Pike County, Alabama. As a young boy, he was inspired by the activism surrounding the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the words of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., which he heard on radio broadcasts. In those pivotal moments, he made a decision to become a part of the Civil Rights Movement. Ever since then, he has remained at the vanguard of progressive social movements and the human rights struggle in the United States.

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THE GREAT MIGRATION

This is the classic photograph that has represented the black family of the Great Migration during the 20th century, when nearly six million African Americans left the south in what became the largest internal migration of any ethnic group in the history of the nation. Known as The Great Migration, when black people went to the North, the Mid-west, and the West seeking a better life than what they had known. History is repeating itself as African Americans are returning to the south.